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Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Maternity

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Ultrasound and Imaging Services

The Obstetric Ultrasound Department and Fetal Medicine Unit both offer a Consultant-led and Sonographer-led service.

Ultrasound scans are available at both the John Radcliffe (JR) Hospital and the Horton General Hospital, but specialist scans are only available at the John Radcliffe Hospital.

John Radcliffe Hospital Ultrasound: 01865 221715

Horton General Hospital Ultrasound: 01295 229453

Dating/nuchal scan

This early ultrasound scan provides important information about the number of babies present and the expected date of delivery.

Pregnancy and the fetal heart can be seen from six weeks gestation by vaginal scan, and from eight to nine weeks by abdominal scan. Accurate measurements and images are taken of the gestational sac and the 'crown to rump' length of the embryo, to accurately date the pregnancy.

If combined screening is accepted at this scan further measurements will be taken.

Please see 'Screening' for further information.

Mid trimester anatomy scan

At 18+0 to 20+6 weeks we scan your baby to assess the major systems of the body for anomalies, the majority of which cannot be picked up through earlier screening. Careful and accurate measurements of the baby are taken to monitor the baby's wellbeing.

At this scan your umbilical artery dopplers will be measured; these measurements help us to detect those babies who may be at higher risk of not growing as we expect.

Based on these measurements you will be placed onto one of three pathways: no additional scans (apart from a routine 36 week scan) or additional scans at various points in your pregnancy. We will tell you which pathway you are on and what this means for your pregnancy.

36 week scan

This scan ensures the baby is growing well, identifies babies that are 'breech' (not head down) and also enables us to identify which babies could be at risk after this point if the pregnancy continues.