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Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Maternity

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Specialist antenatal clinics

We run a number of specialist clinics as a part of our Antenatal Care.

Birth After Caesarean (BAC) clinic

The Birth After Caesarean (BAC) clinic is for women who have concerns about having a vaginal birth when they have had a Caesarean birth previously.

The aim of this clinic is to help women make an informed choice about the birth of their baby.

Breech Clinic

If, at 36 weeks, a baby is lying bottom or feet down, rather than head down, they are in the 'breech' position.

Breech presentation happens in around four percent of pregnancies as the due date approaches.

It is natural to be anxious if this is the case with your baby, but finding out at the 36 week scan does offer time and the ability to make choices about what is right for you.

If your baby is breech, we will write to you after your 36 week scan offering an appointment to explore your options in our Breech Clinic.

The options are:

  • External Cephalic Version (ECV) - a process by which a breech baby can sometimes be moved into the head-down position manually (recommended by national guidelines); the process is successful approximately 50 percent of the time and can be performed at the Breech Clinic on the same day if you wish

and if you do not wish to try ECV, or if it is unsuccessful:

  • vaginal breech birth (for which we have a dedicated on-call team)
  • planned caesarean delivery.

At our Breech Clinic the approach is one of reducing your risk in childbirth, and we offer to turn your baby to enable a normal birth.

We have run an ECV service successfully for 20 years, and have written papers on the safety of this. The data we keep have helped in writing national guidance.

However, some women choose to do nothing immediately, preferring to put their faith in maternal positioning.

Alternatively, there is also a traditional Chinese medicine technique called moxibustion, which when used with acupuncture may result in fewer births by caesarean section, and when combined with maternal positioning techniques may reduce the number of babies that are not head down at birth.

Contact us

Breech Team: breechteam@ouh.nhs.uk

This is not an emergency line - please call MAU with any pregnancy concerns: 01865 220221

Links

Breech Birth UK on Facebook

Breech Birth UK is a Facebook group with around 3,000 members, run by a mother who had a breech birth some years ago.

Women can post their experiences and discuss their decisions and plans; we recognise support from mothers in a similar situation can be beneficial.

Rainbow Clinic

Wednesdays, Antenatal Clinic, John Radcliffe Hospital

The term 'rainbow pregnancy' is used by many families to describe a pregnancy following a pregnancy loss or neonatal death.

The Rainbow Clinic is a specialist service for women and their families who are expecting a baby, having previously experienced a late miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death.

The clinic runs in addition to our recurrent pregnancy loss service, specialist counselling, Silver Star Service and Pre-term Labour Clinic.

Women cared for by the Silver Star Service, Fetal Medicine Unit or Pre-term Labour Clinic during pregnancy can also access the Rainbow Clinic for pastoral and midwifery support.

Team

Specialist Bereavement Midwives

  • Paula Gallacher
  • Laura Payne

Consultant Obstetrician

Ms Veronica Miller

Maternity Support Worker

Candice Noonan

Contact us

Email: RainbowClinic@ouh.nhs.uk
Tel: 01865 227778
Mobile: 07770 967 383