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Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
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Music across the Trust

We have a growing music programme that is being developed across the Trust, consisting of professional musicians giving concerts on wards as well as opportunities for good amateurs to come and play to entertain patients and staff.

Cancer and Haematology Centre concert programme

Oxford Hospitals Charity is delighted to introduce a programme of concerts by professional musicians to celebrate our new piano.

Concerts take place on the first Wednesday of every month at 12.30pm in the Coffee House café, main entrance, Churchill Hospital.

  • 7 November 2018 Eri Sako (violin), Elizabeth Kraeger (piano)
  • 5 December 2018 Frank Harrison (jazz piano)
  • 2 January 2019 Tim Croston (piano)

The concerts are sponsored by family and friends of Emily Jane Page who, together with an anonymous donor, made purchase of the new grand piano possible.

We also invite patients and staff to come and play whenever they wish.

"I've just heard from a mother whose son has been undergoing treatment at the Centre. He was feeling very low and having a cup of tea when someone came in a played 'Someone to Watch over Me' on the piano - it really lifted his spirits." An email from a member of staff

Ultrasounds and Aneurhythms

The Ultrasounds and Aneurhythms are two a cappella singing groups of medical students. Their goal is to bring some of the fun they have performing to benefit patients and staff. They perform on hospital wards in response to requests from staff and in hospital entrances and the West Wing atrium - so listen out for them.

Music programme for wards

Melissa Holding playing the Japanese harp

Melissa Holding playing the Japanese harp to patients in the Level 5 garden

We have an ongoing programme of concerts on wards funded by individual donors and the Radcliffe Trust.

The concerts focus on wards with older patients and those with dementia, on Level 5 and the Complex Medicine Unit. Professional musicians come in to play to patients, their visitors and staff.

Evalutaion of the programme has shown that music has a range of beneficial effects for patients. Many who have little mobility will tap a finger to the music, and music can engage some of the most withdrawn patients, bringing them out of themselves. It has a notably calming effect on wards, encouraging patients to eat better, communicate more effectively with staff and each other, motivating them to get out of bed, and creating a shared social space between patients and staff.

Staff also benefit, often dancing to the music, sometimes with patients if they're able to.

"The musician today was fantastic - I saw patients who were previously disengaged and withdrawn (and some with dementia with some quite challenging behaviour) come to life! They were singing along and smiling. More please!!"
Graham Pike, Charge Nurse, Ward 7B

"Music can be very calming and very relaxing… staff feel that music relaxes most of the patients and it helps staff with a patient who is calm. It also helps patients sleep in the afternoons."
Lynne Douglas, volunteer