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Shoulder and Elbow

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Profile of Professor Jonathan Rees

Jonathan ReesJonathan Rees MB, BS, FRCS (Eng), MD, FRCS (Trauma & Orth)

  • Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculokeletal Science

Professor Jonathan Rees graduated from St Mary's Hospital Medical School, London in 1992. He trained in orthopaedics in Oxford and has specialist fellowship training in routine and complex shoulder and elbow surgery. He was appointed as Clinical Lecturer to the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Sciences in 2003 and was then appointed as University Lecturer and Consultant Orthopaedic Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon in 2005. In 2014 he was made Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Musculoskeletal Science at the University of Oxford. He continues to work as a Consultant Orthopaedic Shoulder and Elbow Surgeon at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre.

Clinical Programme

Professor Rees now focuses clinically on treating elective shoulder conditions, performing routine and complex shoulder surgery with an increasing emphasis on arthroscopic (keyhole) reconstructive surgery of the shoulder. Professor Rees trains postgraduate orthopaedic surgical trainees and future shoulder surgeons.

Education Programme

Professor Rees has been Head of Education for the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science and Head of the MSK Graduate School. He has directed the Trauma, Orthopaedic, Rheumatology and Emergency Medicine Programme for the Oxford University undergraduate medical students and developed a clinical academic training programme in orthopaedic surgery. He set up a regional musculoskeletal GP programme to aid community care, referral patterns and protocols to improve patient pathways and patient experience for orthopaedic patients treated at the NOC and in the community. Professor Rees runs orthopaedic skills courses and lectures on national and international courses.

National Programme

Professor Rees sits on a number of national surgical committee’s and Councils including the British Elbow and Shoulder Society (BESS) and the National Joint Register. He has chaired the BESS Research Committee and led and delivered a James Lind Alliance Priority Setting Partnership in 2015 to identify the top ten UK national research priorities in 'Surgery for Common Shoulder Problems'. He has written a number of national guidelines to help standardise care in the UK for patients with shoulder problems and he provides specialist advice to a number of national bodies.

Research Programme

Professor Rees has a research programme with the main aim of Improving Orthopaedic Patient Outcomes and Treatment Delivery. This is achieved through the following themes:

Orthopaedic simulation, assessment and surgical skills learning. Professor Rees and his group are leaders in this field of research. Project aims include:

Project aims include:

  • Improving surgical performance using surgical simulation studies
  • Development of surgical skill assessment tools
  • Learning curve studies with protocol and guideline development for learning and training

Clinical Pathways and Treatments for shoulder pain. As a shoulder surgeon, Professor Rees has a special research interest in managing patients with shoulder pain from community to primary care, to surgery, and post operative rehabilitation.

Professor Rees runs nationally funded Trials and research studies on treatments of shoulder problems. He has led research into touch screen 'electronic' collection of Oxford patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) in order to improve patient outcomes. In addition, he has also developed a new type of 'Technology Enhanced Patient Information (TEPI)' to help deliver unmet information needs of orthopaedic patients.

For information on Professor Rees' research studies and publications please visit the NDORMS website.

The photograph of Professor Jonathan Rees is courtesy of the Oxford University