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Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

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Frequently asked questions

  • PSP in Bipolar
    • Why was this project needed?
    • How did the partnership come about?
    • Why bipolar? Don't you want to know about other illnesses?
  • Prioritisation process
    • Can other organisations still get involved?
    • How can organisations and the public find out more?
  • Other information
    • How is research currently funded/prioritised?
    • How long will the project take?

PSP in Bipolar

Why was this project needed?

We want to help researchers in bipolar to focus more on answering questions that matter to people whose lives are affected by bipolar. We think this will mean that the findings of research are more likely to make a difference to people's lives.

How did the partnership come about?

Tom Hughes, a Consultant Psychiatrist with Leeds & York Partnership NHS FT, wanted to involve people with bipolar in deciding a research question and designing a study to answer the question. He looked into how this might be done and came across the approach of The James Lind Alliance (JLA). The idea then changed from a single study to involving people with bipolar, their carers, family members, friends and health and social care professionals working in bipolar to agree the priorities for research in bipolar. The JLA put Tom in touch with Jennifer Rendell (Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford), Rachel Churchill (Editor, Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group (CCDAN), Bristol University), Sophie Petit-Zeman (Director of Patient Involvement at the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre, who have part funded the work), Mary-Jane Attenburrow (Senior Clinical Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford) and David Crowe (James Lind Alliance Adviser ) and the partnership was born.

Why bipolar? Don't you want to know about other illnesses?

There have been JLA partnerships to address a wide range of conditions in physical and mental health, and more are planned. You can read about these on the JLA website. If the condition which affects you is not listed the website will tell you how you can get involved in setting up a survey for that condition.

Prioritisation process

Priority Setting Partnerships collect those questions that are considered to be unanswered by research, checks the existing evidence base and removes those questions for which answers are found. The remaining questions go through an interim prioritisation exercise to reduce the long list of questions. A Final Prioritisation Workshop is then held to rank questions in an agreed order of importance.

Can other organisations still get involved?

No the PSP is now completed.

How can organisations and the public find out more?

If you have any questions not answered on this website, please email us:

Other information

How is research currently funded/prioritised?

Research is usually funded by government, charities or the pharmaceutical industry. While valuable, there is evidence that what is currently researched does not always deal with the questions that matter most to people whose lives are affected by, or who treat, ill health.

How long did the project take?

The first Steering Group meeting was held in July 2014. The Final Workshop to set research priorities for Bipolar was held on the 14th June 2016.

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